The Effectiveness of Teaching and Learning Process in Online Education as Perceived by University Faculty and Instructional Technology Professionals

Raghu Naath Singh, David Hurley

Abstract


Objective of the study was to assess selected principles of effective online education. Elements of those principles were identified and ranked in terms of their relative importance through Delphi procedures. Research steps included (1) a review of relevant literature critically reporting challenges and credibility of online course delivery experienced in the higher education, (2) developing a list of major principles for online learning (efficacy, student empowerment, and academic integrity) based on the literature, (3) selecting a sample through a chain-referral technique of faculty members and supporting technology staff involved in online teaching at selected university campuses, (4) interviewing respondents in two rounds to rank goals and means of each of the three evaluative principles, and (5) analyzing data and subjecting them for reliability and validity analyses. The study found strong academic support in the matters of efficacy and student empowerment for online teaching; but also found some concerns respondents had about the issues of maintaining adequate integrity of online courses.    

Keywords: online education, teaching-learning process, identifying three effectiveness evaluation principles of efficacy, student empowerment and academic integrity; ranking goals and means for three principles through Delphi method, reliability, validity 

Keywords


online education, teaching-learning process, identifying three effectiveness evaluation principles of efficacy, student empowerment and academic integrity; ranking goals and means for three principles through Delphi method, reliability, validity

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.14434/jotlt.v6.n1.19528

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.